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Museum Explore

virtual programs


Explore videos below that feature members of our staff engaging with our collections and exhibitions, as well as concert programs.

New content is added regularly.

EXHIBITIONS

Opening lecture for Nikolai Astrup: Visions of Norway.

An overview of Astruptunet and Lake Jølster.

Field and Stream, Forest and Studio: Barbizon Artists in the Outdoors with Anne Leonard.

Erin Shirreff discusses her work and her Clark exhibition, Remainders.

May 6, 2021: Cliché-Verre Talk: Abelardo Morell

March 23, 2021: Haunting Tones: A Conversation about Jennie. C. Jones’ These (Mournful) Shores from the Ground/work exhibition.

Note: This video will be available through October 17, 2021.

February 17, 2021: Opening Lecture for A Change in the Light: The Cliché-verre in Nineteenth-Century France.

January 4, 2021: Clark Connects with Ewa Lajer-Burcharth 

December 28, 2020: Virtual tour of Lin May Saeed: Arrival of the Animals.

December 21, 2020: Join artist Pia Camil as she discusses her work and her current exhibition at the Clark, Velo Revelo.

August 21, 2020: Ground/work guest curators Molly Epstein and Abigail Ross Goodman join a roundtable conversation with Hardymon Director Olivier Meslay about the Clark’s first outdoor exhibition currently being installed across our 140-acre campus.

May 8, 2020: Robert Wiesenberger, Associate Curator of Contemporary Projects, speaks about the new year-long exhibition Velo Revelo by Pia Camil (Mexico, b. 1978).

April 24, 2020: Kristie Couser, Curatorial Assistant for Works on Papers, showcases highlights from her upcoming exhibition, Lines from Life: French Drawings from the Diamond Collection.

April 17, 2020: Kristie Couser, Curatorial Assistant for Works on Paper, showcases highlights from her upcoming exhibition, Lines from Life: Drawings from the Diamond Collection.

April 10, 2020: Kristie Couser, Curatorial Assistant for Works on Paper, offers a virtual preview of her upcoming exhibition, Lines from Life: Drawings from the Diamond Collection.

CONCERTS

Family Bible 
Anonymous
The Southern Harmony (1835/1854)

"Family Bible" is a tune of unbridled joy and bittersweet nostalgia.  Composed in the middle decades of the nineteenth century by an unknown composer,  “The Family Bible that lay on the stand” celebrates home, family, kinship, and memory as the heart of individual and collective identity. It invokes loved ones who have died and the pleasures of childhood. The ecstatic pop-punch of the tune is undercut by shocking dissonances (or “discords” as they are known in the tradition), which give a radiance to the painful pleasure the text describes. 

Ruckus 
John Taylor Ward, bass-baritone
Clay Zeller-Townson, bassoon and leader
Emi Ferguson, flute
Rachel Ellen Wong, violin
Priscilla Herreid, recorder
Loren Ludwig, new england viol
Doug Balliett, violone
Paul Holmes Morton, banjo
Elliot Figg, keyboards
Matthew Aucoin, percussion 

Engineered by Julian McBrowne
Video by Michael Henaghan

Morning
Amos Pilsury (1772-1812)
The United States Sacred Harmony, 1799

Morning paints a desolate landscape of despair as it describes the death of Jesus Christ. The push and pull of harmonies seem to be at once overwhelmingly immense and starkly spare as the melody rises from broken groans to unrestrained wails and back again. This masterful depiction of grief was composed by Amos Pilsbury (1772-1812), a silversmith and schoolmaster who was born in Newbury, MA, died in Charleston, SC, and compiled the influential tune-book The United States Sacred Harmony in 1799. The text is by the English Congregational minister and theologian, Isaac Watts, whose hymn texts are the most frequently used in almost every shape-note publication.

Ruckus 
John Taylor Ward, bass-baritone
Clay Zeller-Townson, bassoon and leader
Emi Ferguson, flute
Rachel Ellen Wong, violin
Priscilla Herreid, oboe
Loren Ludwig, New England tenor viol
Doug Balliett, violone
Paul Holmes Morton, theorbo
Elliot Figg, keyboards
Matthew Aucoin, percussion

Engineered by Julian McBrowne
Video by Michael Henaghan

Holy Manna 
William Moore & George Atkins

In Holy Manna, we see one of the earliest American folk hymns to make its way into main-stream Christian culture. There is little known about its authors, George Atkins (the writer of the text) and William Moore (to whom the tune is attributed), other than the fact that they were in the United States in the first decades of the 1800s. This song is a call to worship, often used in shape-note singings to bring folks back to their seats after a break, and it has been reprinted in over one hundred hymnals since its first publication in 1810. Typical to the genre, it addresses different constituencies of the assembled (brethren, sisters, etc.) in turn, and its easy-flowing melody and rapturous harmonies are an invitation to devotion.

Click here to find a Lexicon of Early American Psalmody and Shape Note Singings in Massachusetts.

Ruckus
John Taylor Ward, bass-baritone
Clay Zeller-Townson, bassoon and leader
Emi Ferguson, flute
Rachel Ellen Wong, violin
Priscilla Herreid, recorder
Loren Ludwig, New England bass viol
Doug Balliett, violone
Paul Holmes Morton, banjo and theorbo
Elliot Figg, keyboards
Matthew Aucoin, percussion

Engineered by Julian McBrowne
Video by Michael Henaghan

The Church's Desolation (1844)
Jesse Thomas White (1821-1894)
from The Sacred Harp

The anonymous text of this hymn is a rebuke of organized religion and Christian hypocrisy. It claims the mantle of righteousness for the broken-hearted as it laments the perversion of Christian love. Framed in square, pentatonic harmonies by one of the founding fathers of The Sacred Harp, J. T. White, this piece is a righteous wail of indignation against the establishment and an urgent call to seek the small and downtrodden. Its stately rhythmic pavane inexorably marches against the powerful, the entrenched, and the comfortable.

Ruckus 
John Taylor Ward, bass-baritone
Clay Zeller-Townson, bassoon and leader
Emi Ferguson, flute
Rachel Ellen Wong, violin
Priscilla Herreid, oboe
Loren Ludwig, new england tenor viol
Doug Balliett, violone
Paul Holmes Morton, theorbo
Elliot Figg, keyboards
Matthew Aucoin, percussion

Engineered by Julian McBrowne
Video by Michael Henaghan

COLLECTIONS

Acquired by the Clark in 2017, Satan by Jean-Jacques Feuchère was created during the height of French Romanticism, a movement that emphasized emotions, imagination, and the power of nature.

March 12, 2021: A new acquisition highlights how ambrotypes in the Civil War era lead to the democratization of the portrait through photography. 

January 18, 2021: Take a look at The Swearing in of President Boyer at the Palace of Haiti, a new acquisition by Adolphe-Eugène-Gabriel Roehn.

November 13, 2020: Ever heard of Jenny Lind, the "Swedish Nightingale?" Learn more about the nineteenth-century singer through this intriguing bottle from our permanent collection!

October 16, 2020: Kathy Morris, Curator of Decorative Arts at the Clark, highlights a striking piece of porcelain in our collection, informally called the “bug plate.” 

September 18, 2020: Loïe Fuller's innovative Serpentine Dance inspired dozens of artist portrayals, including this revolutionary color lithograph by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. Learn more about the dancer and the print in this short video.

May 29, 2020: Valerie Krall, Catalog Librarian, takes us inside the wondrous holdings of the Mary Ann Beinecke Collection of Books on the Decorative Arts, and shows us a recipe for New England pancakes according to the recently transcribed Medical Cooking: A Family Receipt Book.

May 25, 2020: Collections Development Librarian, Terri Boccia, gives an introduction to the many riches within the Clark library collections.

May 22, 2020: Enter the world of Japanese Ukiyo-e prints with Hiroshige's Awa Province: Naruto Whirlpools, a work from 1855 (the Year of the Rabbit) that depicts a natural phenomenon still visited today.

May 18, 2020: Keely Kempster Sarr, Coordinator of Family and Community Programs, explores the story of friendship and blossoming romance behind the sculpture Daphnis and Chloe by the French artist Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux.

May 15, 2020: Robert and Martha Berman Lipp Chief Curator, Esther Bell, discusses an object she's been researching as a part of a future exhibition—Brutus Condemning His Sons to Death by the artist Guillaume Guillon-Lethière—sharing the story of both the painting and its artist.

May 11, 2020: Alexis Goodin, Curatorial Research Associate, takes us into art storage to learn about three porcelain figure groups by Soviet artist Natalya Danko.

May 4, 2020: As part of a new series of live webinars for members, the Clark's Robert and Martha Berman Lipp Chief Curator, Esther Bell, gave a talk on landscape paintings, focused on Pierre-Auguste Renoir's Venice: The Doge's Palace. Today's Clark Connects program shares a condensed version of the talk.

May 1, 2020: A duel between a rhinoceros and an elephant? Dive into the archives to hear about the contest held by Manuel I of Portugal.

April 29, 2020: Editor Kevin Bicknell revisits the production of the book Orchestrating Elegance: Alma-Tadema and the Marquand Music Room and gives us an insider look at the design process.

April 27, 2020: Anne Leonard, Manton Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs, shares the timely story behind James Jacques Tissot's etching Foyer of the Comédie Française (Recollection of the Siege of Paris). 

April 22, 2020: Did you know that Fumée d'Ambre Gris by John Singer Sargent used to sit inside a different frame? Hugh Glover, retired art conservator from the Williamstown Art Conservation Center, reveals the history of the painting's original frame, designed by Sargent himself.

April 20, 2020: In the first of our "Tales from the Vault" series, Curatorial Research Associate Alexis Goodin reveals the surprising history of innovation behind the Arthur J. Stone Iced Beverage Spoons

April 16, 2020: Keely Kempster Sarr, Coordinator of Family and Community Programs, tells the story of The Chariot of Aurora, painted by the Italian artist Giovanni Battista Tiepolo.

April 13, 2020: Curatorial Assistant Nora Rosengarten takes a close look at Victoria Dubourg's Roses in a Porcelain Planter, which was recently brought out of storage and installed in the permanent collection galleries.

April 8, 2020: Amanda Bell Goldmakher, Senior Educator at the Clark, takes a deep dive into George Gray Barnard's sculpture Brotherly Love.