Northern Qi Dynasty Tomb: Lou Rui

The tomb of Lou Rui (pronounced “Lo Ray”) was discovered in 1979 in the southern suburbs of the city of Taiyuan. It followed the traditional design of a domed burial chamber reached by a long, sloping ramp that joined a barrel-vaulted passage. Although once looted by grave robbers, the tomb held many remarkable contents including an extravagantly carved, gilded, and painted stone door and the finest known set of ancient Chinese tomb paintings. Nearly 850 objects, including 600 mingqi guards, warriors, servants, and musicians, filled the tomb to accompany Lou Rui on his transition to the afterlife.

Burial Chamber Door, tomb of Lou Rui (d. 570 CE), Northern Qi dynasty (550–577 CE), unearthed 1979, Wangguo Village, Taiyuan, Shanxi Province, Shanxi Museum, Taiyuan Ornamental Plaque, tomb of Lou Rui (d. 570 CE), Northern Qi dynasty (550–577 CE), Gold with turquoise, amber, and other semi-precious stones and glass inlay, unearthed 1979, Wangguo Village, Taiyuan, Shanxi Province, Shanxi Museum, Taiyuan Chicken-Headed Ewer, tomb of Lou Rui, Northern Qi dynasty (550–577 CE), Glazed earthenware, unearthed 1979, tomb of Lou Rui (d. 570 CE), Wangguo Village, Taiyuan, Shanxi Province, Shanxi Museum, Taiyuan