In conjunction with Steps Off the Beaten Path: Nineteenth-Century Photographs of Rome and Its Environs, the Clark is offering a number of programs related to the exhibition. All events are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted. For information, call 413 458 0524 or visit the
calendar of events.

A Conversation about Steps Off the Beaten Path
Sunday, October 11, 3 pm
Through 100 photographs taken between 1850 and 1880, the exhibition Steps Off the Beaten Path encourages a "walking tour" through Rome with recognizable sites among the out-of-the-way scenes nineteenth-century Romans and Europeans encountered in their daily lives. Ralph Lieberman, architectural historian, photographer, and guest curator of Steps Off the Beaten Path, will discuss the exhibition with collector Bruce Lundberg and architectural historian John Pinto.

From Building to Street Photography Class
Saturdays, October 17, 24, 31, November 7, 14, 21, 10 am to noon
Using the architecture of the Clark and Williamstown, students will explore how people as incidental subjects can help describe an architectural environment. Utilizing the techniques of the street photographer, participants will photograph people as they represent their culture and environment. This series of six classes, held in the Hunter Studio at Stone Hill Center, is best suited for adults and will be taught by Tony Israel of Northern Berkshire Center for the Arts. Enrollment is limited to ten participants.
$105 ($85 for Clark and NBCA members). For more information or to register, contact Northern Berkshire Center for the Arts at 413 663 8338 or visit www.nbcarts.org.

"Projections of Rome" Film Series
Selected Saturdays, 2 pm
The "Projections of Rome" film series extends the Clark's fall focus on representations of Rome from still photography to motion pictures. Screen two takes on Ancient Rome, two romantic fantasies of Rome in the 1950s, and two excursions by the cinematic bard of Rome, Federico Fellini.
October 17: Julius Caesar (1953, 122 min.)
October 24: The Fall of the Roman Empire (1964, 187 min.)
November 7: Roman Holiday (1953, 118 min.)
November 14: Three Coins in a Fountain (1954, 102 min.)
November 21: The White Sheik (1951, 88 min., in Italian with subtitles)
November 28: La Dolce Vita (1960, 174 min., in Italian with subtitles)

When in Rome?
Thursdays, 5:30 pm
The "When in Rome" series of lectures led by Clark staff complements the fall exhibition Steps Off the Beaten Path by looking at Rome during various historic periods.
Registration is not required but can be made by calling 413 458 0489. Cost is $8 per class ($5 for members) or $30 for the series ($18 for members). October 22: The Age of the Emperors
October 29: The Industrial Age
November 5: The Age of the Popes
November 12: The Foreign Academies

Images of Architecture: Before Photography and After
Sunday, October 25, 3 pm
Ralph Lieberman, architectural photographer and historian and guest curator of Steps Off the Beaten Path, will discuss the representation of buildings in paintings and the impact of that tradition on the new medium of photography in the nineteenth century.

Roman Holiday Family Day
Sunday, November 8, 12 to 4 pm
Embark on a Roman Holiday at the Clark. This fun-filled family day celebrates the exhibition Steps Off the Beaten Path with play jousting, ancient Roman crafts, and a scrapbooking workshop. Plus, discover Rome in the Clark's collection and learn to photograph architecture with local photographer Gillian Jones. Activities and admission are free on this day.

Picturesque and Heroic: Nineteenth-Century Painters Imagining the Eternal City
Sunday, November 15, 3 pm
Tom Loughman, assistant deputy director at the Clark, will present a lecture exploring the myriad responses of nineteenth-century painters to the reality and fantasy of Rome. While some artists, such as Camille Corot, envisioned Rome within the realm of the rustic and threadbare, the likes of Jean-Léon Gérôme generated grandiose riffs characterizing antiquity in hyper-dramatic terms. The lecture will address the curious paradox that Rome, which has long been revered as a fountain of inspiration in the visual arts, occupied a place within the nineteenth-century mind that was in as much flux as Italy's political and social conditions.