• The Pre-Impression: Oil Studies and Oil Sketches

  • Edouard Manet

  • Claude Monet

  • Berthe Morisot

  • Pierre-Auguste Renoir

  • Alfred Sisley

  • Edgar Degas

  • Vincent van Gogh and the Post-Impression

  • Checklist of Exhibited Paintings



    This exhibition occurred in the past. This website is available for informational purposes only.

    Alfred Sisley

    Alfred Sisley (1839-1899) was the most committed Impressionist, remaining faithful to the tenets of direct painting from nature until his death in 1899. His approach to the landscape Impression was graphic rather than painterly: with the exception of a few paintings from the 1870s composed in slabs of color, Sisley preferred to construct his landscapes with small brushes, creating hundreds, sometimes thousands, of colored lines on the canvas, as in The By Road at Roches-Courtaut Woods; St. Martin's Summer. Unlike other Impressionists, Sisley often planned his landscape compositions with pencil and paper before quickly tackling them with canvas, brush, and paint. Sisley's Impressions, such as The Fourteenth of July at Marly-le-Roi and The Seine at Billancourt, with their frenzied and vibrant strokes of color, are some of the boldest works in the exhibition.



    Alfred Sisley, The By Road at the Roches-Courtaut Woods;  St. Martin's Summer
    Click to enlarge Alfred Sisley
    The By Road at the Roches-Courtaut Woods; St. Martin's Summer, 1881

    Alfred Sisley, The Fourteenth of July at Marly-le-Roi
    Click to enlarge Alfred Sisley
    The Fourteenth of July at Marly-le-Roi, 1875

    Alfred Sisley, The Seine at Billancourt
    Click to enlarge Alfred Sisley
    The Seine at Billancourt, 1877-78




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