About the Works

Hanging Figure. 1997, resin. Private Collection. © Estate of Juan Muñoz.

Hanging Figure
1997, resin
Private collection

Though early in his career Muñoz often used an architectural vocabulary to tell stories about people, he turned directly toward the human body in the late 1980s. This work, which references Edgar Degas’s famous painting of an acrobat, Miss Lala at the Cirque Fernando, Paris (1879), uses the ambivalence of the figure to allude to more painful, but similar, gestures such as the hanging figures in Francisco de Goya’s Disasters of War series.

Located in Gallery 2, Museum Building
© Estate of Juan Muñoz

 

Seated Figures with Five Drums. 1999, resin. Private collection. © Estate of Juan Muñoz.

Seated Figures with Five Drums
1999, resin
Private collection

The drum is an important motif for Muñoz because it demonstrates the possibility to make new rhythms as an affirmation, renegotiation, or denial of what has been inherited. Interested in how we receive information from our senses, the artist has his “blinded” figures using drums for means other than noise. In this artistic gesture, Muñoz asks how we come to know the world around us.

Located in Gallery 5, Museum Building
© Estate of Juan Muñoz

 

Piggyback with Knife. 2001, bronze with yellow patina. Courtesy Marian Goodman Gallery, New York. © Estate of Juan Muñoz.

Piggyback with Knife
2001, bronze with yellow patina
Courtesy Marian Goodman Gallery, New York

One of Muñoz’s last sculptures, this bronze with yellow patina shows his continued interest in the human figure and enigmatic relationships as it references inherent, yet unrealized, dangers like the very early First Banister inside does.

Spencer Terrace, Stone Hill Center
© Estate of Juan Muñoz

 

First Banister. 1987, Wood and knife. Private collection. © Estate of Juan Muñoz.

First Banister
1987
Wood and knife
Private collection

One of his earliest works, the banister with knife attached takes an architectural object we know and undermines the safety and assurance it has come to connote. In this confrontation with expectation, the object asks for awareness and signals the danger that comes with blind acceptance of the status quo.

Stone Hill Center
© Estate of Juan Muñoz

 

Hotel Declercq II. 1987–2000, iron. Private collection. © Estate of Juan Muñoz.

Hotel Declercq II
1987–2000, iron
Private collection

Another early piece, the small balcony removed from context and place transforms its adopted wall into a metaphor for imagination and how our minds can conjure new worlds from white space and possibility.

Stone Hill Center
© Estate of Juan Muñoz

 

Many Times. 1997, resin. Private collection. © Estate of Juan Muñoz.

Many Times
1999, resin
Private collection

Similarly dressed and all modeled on an Art Nouveau ceramic bust of a head with Asian features that Muñoz discovered in a hotel, the figures in Many Times activate the physical space we share while raising ideas of otherness, the power of crowds, and isolation.

Lipp Gallery, Stone Hill Center
© Estate of Juan Muñoz

 

Derailment. 2000–2001, corten steel. Private collection. © Estate of Juan Muñoz.

Derailment
2000–2001, corten steel
Private collection

Like such early works as First Banister and Hotel Declercq II, Muñoz’s derailed steel train (a nod to Richard Serra) implies human presence through its noticeable absence. It also questions if the built world is as fragile as the individual who could be a passenger in the train, or one who might live in the abandoned cityscape shaped in miniature inside the train cars.

Clark Gallery, Stone Hill Center
© Estate of Juan Muñoz

 

Conversation Piece. 2001, bronze and steel cable. Private collection. © Estate of Juan Muñoz.

Conversation Piece
2001, bronze and steel cable
Private collection

One could almost see this installation, in its dramatic composition, as a reworking of Auguste Rodin’s Burghers of Calais (1895). But unlike the Rodin sculpture or any sculptural arrangement that depicts historical figures, we do not know who or what goads Muñoz’s drama into visceral action. Each viewer is invited to participate and bring his or her own experiences to this work’s ongoing conversation.

Moltz Terrace, Stone Hill Center
© Estate of Juan Muñoz

 

Many sufferers seek how buy viagra without a prescription online medical.